Month: January 2015

The letter at story time today was S (s).

We heard stories about snow, including Oh! by Kevin Henkes.

We sang Snow Falls Gently (to the tune of Mary Had a Little Lamb)
Snow falls gently to the ground, to the ground, to the ground
Snow falls gently to the ground in the wintertime

Catch the snowflakes on your tongue, on your tongue, on your tongue
Catch the snowflakes on your tongue in the winter time

Build a snowman round and fat, round and fat, round and fat
Build a snowman round and fat in the winter time

The early literacy tip was about singing:
“Make it up! You can make up all sorts of words to familiar tunes to fit whatever you are doing. This is a great practice for kids to fit what they’re doing into a rhyme and rhythm. The more they understand about language, the easier reading will come when they start learning!”

“Mama, did you do a great job cutting the pear,” H said to me from his perch on the counter, pear slice in hand. Although his verb placement indicated a question, his cadence suggested a statement.

“You think I did a great job cutting the pear,” I said, knowing he would correct me if I got it wrong.

“Yeah.”

“Thank you, sweets. That is a nice compliment.”

I matched my reaction to the intensity of his delivery. It was hard not to burst into song while jumping up and down, but I managed to keep it to a big smile.

I think this may be my first compliment from him. It felt good.

The letter at story time today was A (a).

We heard stories about art, including Blue Chicken by Deborah Freedman and I’m the Best Artist in the Ocean by Kevin Sherry.

We sang Making Great Art (to the tune of The Wheels on the Bus)
The painter with the brush goes swish, swish, swish
Swish, swish, swish
Swish, swish, swish
The painter with the brush goes swish, swish, swish
To make some great art!

The sculptor with the clay goes squish, squish, squish…
The sketcher with the pencil goes scratch, scratch, scratch…
The artist with the crayon goes scribble, scribble, scribble…

The early literacy tip was about reading:
“Read the pictures! The art in a book can sometimes tell us just as much or more about what is going on in a story. When you’re reading a book, read the pictures, too, and talk to your kids about what the pictures tell you.”